© 2018 European Generation All Rights Reserved

© 2018 European Generation All Rights Reserved

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon

September 15, 2019

September 11, 2019

Please reload

Recent Posts

BREXIT: The System is broken and the fix won’t be simple

June 26, 2016

 

+++ ITALIAN VERSION BELOW +++

 

It seems pretty clear to me: Friday was an historic day. Even if not with a large majority (51,9%), the people of the United Kingdom has spoken: it’s Brexit. London is going to leave the European Union in about two years’ time. The ways in which this will happen are still uncertain: it is in fact the first time that a Members States unilaterraly recedes from the Union. There are many analysis the we could draft but it is very premature: we’ll have to wait until the conditions that will define the relationship between the UK and European Union will be clarified. It is nevertheless important to address what happened with two distinct perspectives: the European one and the British one.

 

Historically, the central axis of European leadership had to be found in the Franco-German alliance, dating back to the end of World War Two. In this context of a “continental leadership”, the UK has always been one step aside of the founding States, always keeping skepticism towards the European project. Examples can be found in the late entry, happened in 1973, in the decision of not adopting the common currency and in not fully joining the Schengen area. It might not be such a surprise that the first state to be leaving the European Union is the UK. In spite of these conditions, it is not enough to be optimistic: the risk of a domino effect is strong, and this might lead other countries to the same decision. Furthermore, in the short run, the negative economic consequences are already evident: the British Pound has faced the worst loss of value of its history and all the European stock markets have faced serious losses. In the long run, the scenarios are more uncertain, as they’ll be influenced by the outcome of the upcoming negotiations that will define the UK position in the common market.

 

The most disappointing analysis has anyway to be developed on the political perspective. Many think, in fact, that the Brexit is nothing less than the beginning of a process of disgregation of the European Union, that would prove to be unstoppable. Are we really at the point of no return? If the other states will follow the British path, we might actually be. At the same time a small minority thinks just the opposite: the EU is stronger without the UK. Thanks to the shock produced by the Referendum and the end of british opposition, Union can push towards a series of reforms that would otherwise be impossible. The debate that heated many during the ‘90s is now present again: should we prefer a deeper but smaller union? Is this the opportunity to build the basis of an Union of States that democratically accept of sharing their sovereignty? Although I personally support this conception of Europe, it is hardly to believe that a process of a further integration will be easier through Brexit. On the short term, we should expect the exact opposite: the euroskeptic parties will probably gain support since they are celebrating their first historic success.

 

Let’s focus now on the propaganda on which the success of the “Leave” was built, supported by UKIP of mr. Farage and the Tory trend lead by Boris Johnson. When the reasons proposed weren’t pure xenophobia or cospiration theory, as for the reactions to deputee Joe Cox’s assassination, the motivations behind were very vague. It is evident that a large role was played by the influence of the themes of the extreme right: populism against migration, support of national sovereignty against EU’s rules and bureaucracy, the conception of democracy as a mean and not as a goal in itself, and the strong refuse of any idea of an European super-central State. The latter is for sure the most interesting, but let me be skeptical of this project, considering the economic and geopolitical risks that an involution like that may bring. Another interesting point in favour of Brexit, more liberal than the other ones, is the opportunity that UK will have in making free trade deals with emerging economies, without the burden of limitations set by the EU. But it is not clear how they think to negotiate this agreements and how the loss of traditional partners could automatically bring new deals with countries sited on the other side of the world. Moreover, I think that the people who voted Leave are the more inclined to avoid new competition from abroad, because they could loose even more, and more probably they see Brexit as an opportunity for strenghting protectionism.

 

Even if the influence of extreme right is evident, it cannot explain such a big success. According to Nigel Farage: “[Brexit] is a victory of the ordinary people against big banks, big business and big politics”. This sounds a lot like the typical propaganda of a certain extreme left tradition. Always considering globalization and free trade as the sources of any problem may lead to a call for more protectionism, while instead the best choice would be looking for a common solution and that can lower the risks in the financial sector without loosing the benefits of the free market. I cannot call myself a supporter of top-down policies, but implying that an impairment of the financial centre of London and big business would benefit the middle class, well, it’s even a wronger assumption, as it is clear that those sectors are crucial for the British economic system. The violent anti-EU propaganda was pervasive but no proposal of a valid alternative has been put forward for the future of UK, that will remain with relevant economic problems, such as the weakness of the industrial sector and the low productity.

 

To sum up, today all the europeists should admit their defeat, and every political area is called to reflect on it and discuss on how to solve the political and economic stagnation that has affected Europe in the last 10 years. Because there is something we cannot argue against euroskeptical on: the EU has evident problems and nobody could sincerely call himself satisfied by the state of the Union.

But there’s one last loser, that is the (almost) former prime minister David Cameron, who yesterday morning effectively calmed the stock market announcing his resignation by October. He promised a referendum to win the general elections and to solve the conflicts inside his party, avoiding the responsabilities of the Government as usually happens in a weak democratic system, and now he is risking UK disgregation, with Scotland threating indipendece once again and North Ireland proposing the reunification with Eire. From the prime minister of most ancient democracy in the world, these are quite remarkable results

 

 

-------

BREXIT: Il sistema si è incrinato e non sarà facile aggiustarlo

Mi pare di capire che siamo tutti d’accordo: ieri è stata una giornata di importanza storica. Anche se non con una larga maggioranza (51,9%), il popolo del Regno Unito ha detto sì al Brexit: Londra lascerà l’Unione Europea entro due anni. La modalità sono ancora incerte: è infatti il primo caso di Stato membro che decide unilateralmente di recedere dall’Unione. Le analisi che si possono fare sono molteplici ma è inutile lanciarsi in previsioni azzardate fino a quando lo status del Regno Unito rispetto al resto del continente non sarà ben definito. Mi sembra però doveroso analizzare l’avvenimento sia da una prospettiva europeista sia ponendo molta attenzione alle ragioni che hanno portato a questa scelta.

 

Storicamente, l’asse centrale dell’UE è stato l’alleanza franco-tedesca, già a partire dalla fine del secondo conflitto mondiale. In questo quadro di leadership continentale, il Regno Unito ha sempre tenuto una posizione più defilata rispetto agli Stati fondatori, conservando sempre scetticismo verso il progetto europeo. Ne sono un esempio il tardivo ingresso, arrivato solo nel 1973, la decisione di non adottare la moneta comune e l’ingresso incompleto nell’Area Schengen. Non dovrebbe quindi sorprendere che sia proprio il Regno Unito il primo Paese a decidere di abbandonare l’Unione. Nonostante siano queste le premesse, la situazione è comunque di poco conforto: il rischio che possa innescarsi un “effetto domino” è alto, e ciò potrebbe portare altri Paesi a compiere la stessa scelta. Nel breve termine, gli effetti economici negativi sono sotto gli occhi di tutti: il deprezzamento della Sterlina è uno dei più gravi della storia e nella giornata di venerdì le principali Borse europee hanno chiuso ampiamente in negativo. Nel lungo periodo poi, le previsioni non sono certo più incoraggianti, anche se dipenderanno molto dagli esiti dei negoziati per l’uscita e se il Regno Unito manterrà o meno la sua posizione nel mercato unico.

 

La riflessione più cocente riguarda però un piano prettamente politico: per molti, il Brexit è niente meno che l’inizio di un’inarrestabile processo di disgregazione dell’Unione Europea. Siamo davvero quindi al punto di non ritorno? Se davvero gli altri Paesi dovessero seguire l’esempio britannico, è un’eventualità da non sottovalutare. Allo stesso tempo però c’è una convinta minoranza che sostiene, al contrario, che un’Europa senza il Regno Unito sia più forte e coesa. Grazie alla scossa prodotta dal referendum e alla fine delle resistenze britanniche, l’Unione Europea sarebbe finalmente pronta a lanciarsi in riforme che sarebbero altrimenti impossibili. Stiamo assistendo ad una rifioritura del dibattito che negli anni ’90 appassionò molti in Europa: meglio quindi un’unione più profonda ma meno larga? Si starebbero quindi ponendo le basi di un’Unione composta solo dagli Stati che democraticamente accettano di condividere la propria sovranità? Anche se chi scrive è un convinto sostenitore di questa idea di Europa, pensare che l’uscita del Regno Unito agevoli questo processo di integrazione è pura miopia. Anzi, nel breve termine, è ben più probabile che porti solo fiducia e consenso alle forze euroscettiche, che ora possono finalmente vantare un primo successo concreto.

 

Vorrei ora concentrarmi in particolare sull’analisi della propaganda che ha portato al successo della fazione del “Leave”, rappresentato dallo UKIP di Farage e dalla corrente del Partito Conservatore di Boris Johnson. Obiettivamente, quando non si è sfociato nella xenofobia o nel puro complottismo, come nel caso dell’assassinio della deputata Joe Cox, le motivazioni a favore del Brexit sono state tra le più disparate. Innegabile è l’influenza della destra nazionalista: il classico populismo contro l’immigrazione, l’esaltazione della sovranità nazionale contro l’intrusione di attori esterni come la “burocrazia” di Bruxelles, la democrazia utilizzata come fine e non come mezzo, la repulsione per qualsiasi idea di un super-Stato Europeo centralizzato. Sebbene quest’ultima sia chiaramente la motivazione più degna di nota, lo scetticismo per un’Europa delle nazioni è sano e lecito, considerati i rischi geopolitici ed economici che un’involuzione del genere comporterebbe. Altro punto interessante di discussione, sicuramente di impronta più liberale, è sostenere che ora il Regno Unito possa finalmente stringere accordi di libero scambio con le economie emergenti senza i vincoli di Bruxelles. Anche se il nesso logico secondo cui rinunciare ai propri naturali e consolidati partner commerciali porti di per sé a vantaggiosi accordi con Paesi dall’altra parte del mondo, mi pare sia quantomeno azzardato. E’ oltretutto evidente che i sostenitori del Leave siano le categorie che più rischiano di perdere da un’ulteriore apertura dei mercati e che, molto probabilmente, vedono il Brexit come un’opportunità per ottenere più protezionismo.

 

Anche se l’influenza della destra populista è evidente, da sola non basta a spiegare tale successo. Secondo Nigel Farage: “[Il Brexit] è una vittoria della gente comune contro le grandi banche, il grande business e la grande politica”. Questa suona proprio come propaganda di una certa tradizione di ultra-sinistra. Dipingere il libero mercato e la globalizzazione come responsabili di ogni male non può che portare alla richiesta di più protezionismo, quando sarebbe più saggio cercare nuove regole e accordi a livello sovranazionale per limitare rischi eccessivi senza rinunciare ai vantaggi del mercato comune. Personalmente, mi ritengo uno scettico riguardo alle politiche top-down, ma pensare che indebolire la City e le grandi banche possa portare a vantaggi per il ceto medio mi pare una deduzione ancora più errata, soprattutto quando è evidente che gran parte dell’economia del Regno Unito dipenda dal settore finanziario e sia sostenuta dall’ingresso di capitali stranieri. La feroce retorica contro l’Unione Europea non è sicuramente mancata durante questa campagna ma neppure l’ombra di qualsiasi serio progetto economico alternativo per il futuro del Regno Unito, che rimane con evidenti problemi economici, quali un debole apparato industriale e una produttività stagnante da anni.

In sintesi, oggi tutti gli europeisti farebbero bene ad ammettere la propria sconfitta, e ogni parte politica è chiamata a riflettere su questo insuccesso e a discutere su come far uscire l’Europa dalla stagnazione politica ed economica che imperversa ormai da un decennio. Se c’è una questione su cui non possiamo non concordare con gli euroscettici è proprio questa: l’UE ha evidenti problemi e così com’è nessuno può ritenersi davvero soddisfatto.

 

C’è però un ultimo grande sconfitto, il (quasi) ex-primo ministro David Cameron, che ieri mattina ha efficacemente tranquillizzato le Borse annunciando le sue dimissioni entro ottobre. Dopo l’azzardo di promettere il referendum per vincere la precedente tornata elettorale e mettere una pezza alle questioni interne al suo Partito, ha scaricato l’esecutivo di ogni responsabilità, come avviene nei regimi democratici ancora deboli, mentre ora rischia addirittura la disgregazione del Regno Unito: da una parte la Scozia minaccia di nuovo la secessione, dall’altra il Nord Irlanda la riunificazione con l’Eire. Per il primo ministro della democrazia più antica del mondo, direi che è un risultato niente male.

Please reload

Follow Us
Please reload

Archive
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square